Many chronic kidney disease patients ‘should take statins’

November 14 2014
According to research published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology , as chronic kidney disease increases the risk of heart disease, patients with the former are advised to carefully manage their cholesterol levels. Now, researchers reviewing two sets of guidelines for cholesterol management have stated that nearly all people with pre-dialysis kidney disease should receive statins.

However, the study, published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, also reports that 50% of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients who should be in receipt of statins are not taking the cholesterol-lowering medication.

Co-author of the study Dr. Lisandro Colantonio, of the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health, says the findings show "there is an unmet treatment need and a missed opportunity for lowering heart disease risk among patients with CKD."

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that around 10% of adults in the US - over 20 million people - could have CKD. These patients are all at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attacks and strokes.

High levels of cholesterol also increase the risk of heart disease. Statins are medicines that are routinely used to reduce cholesterol in the body, and they can play a key role in preventing the build-up of plaque in the arteries, restricting the flow of blood.

To read more please read the original article.

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